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A limited-liability company ("LLC") is commonly referred to as a "hybrid" business structure, meaning that it shares characteristics of both a corporation and a sole proprietorship. It allows its owners to insulate themselves from personal liability for business debts, does not require the payment of separate business taxes (the tax "passes through" to its owners), allows for a great deal of flexibility with regards to its organizational structure, and is subject to fewer regulations and restrictions than are other types of business structures.[1] Establishing such a company in Wisconsin is a rather straightforward process.

An important part of LLC formation is the registered agent. A registered agent must be a person who is located in the state in which you are forming your LLC. This is the person you designate to receive legal service of process, as well as government forms and notices, on behalf of your LLC. He or she must have a physical street address (not a P.O. box).
Articles of organization are short, simple documents. In fact, you can usually prepare your own in just a few minutes by filling in the blanks and checking the boxes on a form provided by your state's filing office. Typically, you must provide only your LLC's name, its address, and sometimes the names of all of the owners -- called members. Generally, all of the LLC owners may prepare and sign the articles, or they can appoint just one person to do so.
The articles of organization also should include information about how your LLC will be managed. You need to indicate whether the members of the LLC will do hands-on management or if there will be hired management. Another requirement is to discuss how long the LLC will be in existence (there is no limit on this, so it is fine to say in perpetuity).
In this case, you need to write a remark about that circumstance on the Business Property Statement, or on an attachment to it. Also fill out Part III (Equipment Belonging To Others) of the form. If you own any small equipment, such as a printer, copier, etc., that you are using in the business, you should report these costs under Part II of the Business Property Statement and also Schedule A.
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